Tucson Tom's Camry Pages

I own a 1999 Camry with a V6 engine.

Note that a 1999 Camry is a "Gen 4" (1997-2001 are Gen 4). Apparently Toyota has a tradition or practice of releasing new models every 5 years.

Camry's of this vintage were made both in Japan and in the USA. There are important differences and you may need to know when ordering parts. Rumor has it that if your VIN begins with "J" it was made in Japan. Mine begins with "JT2BF" For example I ordered a replacement side mirror and it came with some kind of circular snap in fixture on the back. This was for a USA vehicle, not a Japan made vehicle like mine.

Motor

My Camry has a V6 engine. This is called a 1MZ-FE and is a 3.0 liter engine. Happily this is a non-interference engine, meaning that if the timing belt breaks, catastrophic engine damage will not occur (the car just stops running).

This engine has a problem known as "oil gelling" or "engine sludge". They key is to do oil changes on the proper schedule.

The other engine you are likely to hear about is the 4 cylinder 5S-FE (2.2 liter).

Key fob

The battery seems to be a 2032 coin cell. There are some mysteries about the security system and the key fobs you need for them. As I remember there are different grey and black ones (that both look black). I guess mine are the "grey", but I am not entirely sure, but if you go to Ebay to order these you will have to sort this out properly.

Wheels

You need a 21mm socket for the lug nuts. The torque spec is 76 ft-lbs. 32 psi is the recommended pressure, but running the tires at 35 will give a little better gas mileage.

Intake Manifold, plugs, valve cover

Well, packrats chewed the wire off two of the rear injectors, and it looks like I need to remove the intake manifold to do the repair. I'll also have to do something to discourage the packrats in the future, but that is a different problem. Here is one guy's list to remove:
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. On vehicles equipped with an air bag, wait at least 90 seconds before proceeding.
  2. Drain the engine coolant into a suitable container.
  3. Disconnect the accelerator cable from the throttle body. If equipped with automatic transmission, disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle body.
  4. Disconnect the intake air temperature sensor connector
  5. On California models, disconnect the air cleaner hose.
  6. Loosen the air cleaner hose clamp bolt, disconnect the 4 air cleaner cap clips, disconnect the air hose from the throttle body, and remove the air cleaner cap together with the resonator and the air cleaner hose.
  7. Tag and remove the electrical connections and hoses from the throttle body.
  8. Remove the throttle body. Type A throttle bodies are secured with 4 bolts and Type B throttle bodies are secured with 2 bolts and 2 nuts.
  9. Remove the vacuum hose bracket and the engine wiring harness from the intake manifold.
  10. . Remove the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve.
  11. . Remove the 4 bolts, the wire bracket, the No. 1 air intake chamber, and the manifold stays. Remove the 6 bolts, 2 nuts, the intake manifold, and the gasket.
And to install:
  1. Install the intake manifold to the cylinder head with a new gasket. Tighten the 6 bolts and the 2 nuts in several passes to 14 ft. Lbs. (19 Nm). Install the 2 wire clamps to the wire brackets on the intake manifold.
  2. Install the vacuum hose bracket and the engine wiring harness.
  3. Install the No. 1 air intake chamber and manifold stays with the 4 bolts. Tighten the 14mm bolts to 31 ft. Lbs. (42 Nm) and tighten the 12mm bolts to 16 ft. Lbs. (22 Nm).
  4. Install the EGR valve.
  5. Install the throttle body with a new gasket on the intake chamber. Connect the hoses and electrical connections to the throttle body. (The protrusion on the gasket should be facing down and the water hose connections on the throttle body should also face down.)
  6. On type A throttle body, tighten the 4 bolts to 14 ft. Lbs. (19 Nm). Bolt A is 45mm in length and bolt B is 55mm

Have any comments? Questions? Drop me a line!

Tom's Tacoma pages / tom@mmto.org